Blepharospasm (Eyelid Spasm)

Blepharo means “eyelid.” Spasm means “uncontrolled muscle contraction.” The term blepharospasm [‘blef-a-ro-spaz-m] can be applied to any abnormal blinking or eyelid tic or twitch resulting from any cause, ranging from dry eyes to Tourette’s syndrome to tardive dyskinesia. The blepharospasm referred to here is officially called benign essential blepharospasm (BEB) to distinguish it from the less serious secondary blinking disorders.

It is a chronic benign (non-life-threatening) condition with abnormal, uncontrolled (involuntary) eyelid spasms and facial spasms or contractions on both sides. Patients in Beverly Hills with blepharospasm have normal eyes. The visual disturbance is due solely to the forced closure of the eyelids. Blepharospasm should not be confused with true eyelid droopiness (ptosis) and hemifacial spasms (one sided eyelid or facial spasms/contractions). Support groups in LA are available (see www.blepharospasm.org).

Causes of Eyelid Spasms

Blepharospasm has many different causes that vary from individual to individual. Sometimes, eyelid spasms occur as a symptom of a greater problem such as orbital tumors, but are generally experienced as a result of fatigue, too much caffeine, and not enough sleep. In some extreme cases, the cause behind severe eyelid spasms cannot be identified, which can sometimes result in the scratching of a cornea and an eyelid to close completely. If you’re experiencing symptoms of spasms on your eye and are unsure what may be causing them, Dr. Taban in Los Angeles is an expert at assisting patients with various treatment options for blepharospasm and may be able to help you.

For more information on Blepharospasm please visit, WebMD.com.

Treatments For Blepharospasm

The mainstay treatment for blepharospasm (and hemifacial spasm) is periodic botulinum toxin injections. This is a toxin produced by the bacteria Clostridium botulinum. It weakens the muscles by blocking nerve impulses transmitted from the nerve endings of the muscles. When it is used to treat blepharospasm, minute doses of botulinum toxin are injected intramuscularly into several sites above and below the eyes. The sites of the injection will vary slightly from patient to patient and according to physician preference. They are usually given on the eyelid, the brow, and the muscles under the lower lid. The injections are carried out with a very fine needle.

There are a variety of botulinum toxin products including BOTOX, DYSPORT, and XEOMIN. Botox was first approved in 1989 to treat blepharospasm. They each work by temporarily weakening or paralyzing the affected muscle spasms. Benefits begin in 1-14 days after the treatment and last for an average of three to four months. Long-term follow-up studies have shown it to be a very safe and effective treatment, with up to 90 percent of patients obtaining almost complete relief of their blepharospasm. Side effects are usually rare and technique dependent. They include drooping of the eyelid (ptosis), double vision (diplopia), and tearing. All are transient and recover spontaneously.

How to Prevent Uncontrollable Eyelid Twitching

Though eyelid spasms require different preventative measures for everyone who experiences them, there are some measures that should be followed in hopes of stopping reoccurring eyelid twitching. For starters, getting an appropriate amount of sleep each night and drinking less caffeine can potentially reduce the amount of eyelid spasms you experience. Giving your eyes daily doses of eye drops has also proved to be an extremely effective measure in the reduction of eyelid spasms.

Next read about, Chemosis.

I visited Dr. Taban to receive Botox. … He knows the perfect spots to put the Botox so your brows dont slump. As well as where to put it to make your eyes look open, alive, and youthful. … Over in a flash and now I’m looking better than ever. Thank you so much …

Brittany S.

Brittany S.

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